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Organization Profile: International Foundation for Electoral Systems Indonesia

ifes-worldwideIFES Worldwide

As the global leader in democracy promotion, IFES advances good governance and democratic rights by providing technical assistance to election officials; empowering the underrepresented to participate in the political process; and applying field-based research to improve the electoral cycle. Since 1987, IFES has worked in over 135 countries, from developing democracies to mature democracies.

History of IFES in Indonesia

Since 1998, IFES has provided technical assistance to support Indonesia’s civil society and democratic institutions. Emerging from over three decades of “New Order” authoritarian rule in 1998, Indonesia entered an era of bold reform characterized by democratic institution building and decentralization of governance. Not without challenges and setbacks, this program of Reformasi has proven largely successful. Indonesia is seen today as a vibrant regional example of democracy working to achieve political stability in a nation of varied culture, religion, politics, and regional identities.

Much of IFES’ assistance has focused on supportingIfes-indonesia-image1 Indonesia’s General Elections Commission (KPU) in efforts to improve electoral management and operations. Over the last three national election cycles IFES provided international support to legal and regulatory drafting, electoral system design, results reporting and seat allocation, electoral boundary delimitation, electoral dispute resolution, voter registration, poll worker training material, voter education and public information. IFES programs have often reached beyond the KPU to involve the Constitutional Court, the Indonesian Legislature, the Ministry of Home Affairs, and KPU provincial and regency/municipality (kabupaten/kota) offices. IFES has also supported civil society initiatives in civic and voter education, elections violence monitorinIfes-indonesia-image2g, disability access, women’s representation, money and politics, and electoral reform.

One of IFES current initiatives has also launched a regional effort to support electoral access for persons with disabilities with local partners in Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines, Vietnam, Laos, Malaysia and Cambodia.

This network is led by Indonesian civil society partners. New and enhanced methodologies for monitoring disability access will include regional indices and reports to regional bodies. Findings from monitoring missions are shared with CSOs in several ASEAN member states. IFES fosters a dialogue to share best practices in disability access, and build new partnerships between DPOs and election CSOs to advocate for the electoral rights of persons with disabilities.

The activities of IFES Indonesia are funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and by the Australian Government.

AGENDA Newsletter - 3rd Edition

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3rd Edition

Featured News

History of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with DisabilitiesHistory of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

The United Nations Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), commonly referred to as “the Disability Convention”, is a unique human rights instrument that serves as both a development tool and a human rights instrument. Also, it is a legally binding policy instrument which is cross-disability and cross sector. The purpose of Disability Convention, as stated in Article 1, is to “promote, protect and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by all persons with disabilities, and to promote respect for their inherent dignity.” The Convention stipulates aspects and sectors related to disability rights and how to adopt the principles into the legislations and program actions. Hence, every state that has ratified the CRPD should adopt the Convention into its national and local legislation. The Convention is followed by the optional protocol to implement the convention strategically in the States parties. The Optional Protocol is also an international treaty.

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AGENDA Puts Training Module

Agenda Put its Training Module to Test

On 17-18 October 2012, AGENDA organized a tryout for the training module on accessible election that is intended to train Election Management Bodies officers in Southeast Asia countries. The purpose of the tryout is to test whether the training package is already suitable for the targeted audience. The event took place in Cisarua, a city lies about 100 kilometers from Jakarta. There were 20 participants invited, consisting of the commissionaires of KPU Jakarta, Bawaslu (national bureau of election monitoring), Panwaslu (the election monitoring body at provincial level), and PPK (district election committee). Participants are expected to give inputs on the training materials, teaching methods, presentations, games, role play, facilitators, and logistics.

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Organization Profile

jppr-logo

People’s Voter Education Network (Jaringan Pendidikan Pemilih Rakyat, JPPR)

People’s Voter Education Network (JPPR) is a network of 38 institutions consisting of social organizations under Nahdlatul Ulama (NU), Muhammadiyah, NGOs, educational institutions, interfaith institutions, student institutions, and radio channels.Members of JPPR work at the national and provincial level, Regency/City, District, up to Village.

The vision of JPPR is to realize an Indonesian society that is aware, knowledgeable, and active in building people’s sovereignty. Since its founding in 1998, JPPR has actively promoted democratic education for Indonesian people, mainly by observing the conduct of General and local elections in Indonesia.

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Interview

Nguyen Hong Ha: A Story of Determination

"Even if a mountain is high, there is always a way to reach the top -- and although the way might be full of danger, there is always a way for someone to get through it. (Vietnamese Proverb)"

The proverb above may be the best one to describe Nguyen Hong Ha -- a Vietnamese woman, a human rights activist. When her mother learned Hong Hahn had polio, she knew that life would become difficult. “It was the most serious case,” Ha’s mother said. It resulted in her using a wheelchair now.

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On The Horizon

View Full Calender

Sat Nov 10-11, 2012
2nd Regional Dialogue on Access to Elections for Persons with Disabilities
Mon Nov 12, 2012
Partners Coordination Meeting
Tue Nov 13, 2012
Workshop on training module for regional partners

Photo Gallery

AGENDA Newsletter 3rd Edition


Multimedia

  • Video - Testimonies of PwDs. Click here

  • Blackboard Collaborate for AGENDA Conference on 10-11 November 2012. For more information click here

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Agenda Put its Training Module to Test

news-agenda-puts-training-module-image2On 17-18 October 2012, AGENDA organized a tryout for the training module on accessible election that is intended to train Election Management Bodies officers in Southeast Asia countries. The purpose of the tryout is to test whether the training package is already suitable for the targeted audience. The event took place in Cisarua, a city lies about 100 kilometers from Jakarta. There were 20 participants invited, consisting of the commissionaires of KPU Jakarta, Bawaslu (national bureau of election monitoring), Panwaslu (the election monitoring body at provincial level), and PPK (district election committee). Participants are expected to give inputs on the training materials, teaching methods, presentations, games, role play, facilitators, and logistics.

The training module covers materials that EMB should learn, namely the foundation of political rights of persons with disabilities, what their rights are, a closer look on disability issues, how to establish an accessible election, what aspects should be monitored in terms of accessible election, and what role every stakeholder must take to ensure that accessibility is integrated in all stages of election.

One of the most memorable parts of the training is the sensitivity session, in which participants had a taste of how it feels like to be blind and to use wheelchair. This session is aimed to raise their awareness of how important accessible environment is as well as introducing them through direct experience the difficulties that are faced by persons with disabilities and learn how to interact with them. news-agenda-puts-training-module-image1The participants, blind-folded and confined to wheelchairs, were asked to reach the designated spots around the training vicinity. During the role play, they began to realize the importance of creating a barrier-free environment and the impact of inaccessible facilities to their mobility, which lead to other aspect of persons with disabilities life, including participation in election. Inaccessible polling station is one of the causes of the low turnout of voters with disabilities.

Besides learning, the participants also had an opportunity to have a dialogue with DPO at the last session. This two-way dialogue is aimed to start a relationship between electoral stakeholders and persons with disabilities community. In this way, all parties can establish collaboration and planning on programs related to accessible election.

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Organization Profile: People’s Voter Education Network (Jaringan Pendidikan Pemilih Rakyat, JPPR)

People’s Voter Education Network (JPPR) is a network of 38 institutions consisting of social organizations under Nahdlatul Ulama (NU), Muhammadiyah, NGOs, educational institutions, interfaith institutions, student institutions, and radio channels. JPPR Monitoring the 2011 Local Election in JogjakartaMembers of JPPR work at the national and provincial level, Regency/City, District, up to Village.

The vision of JPPR is to realize an Indonesian society that is aware, knowledgeable, and active in building people’s sovereignty. Since its founding in 1998, JPPR has actively promoted democratic education for Indonesian people, mainly by observing the conduct of General and local elections in Indonesia.

In the 1999 Legislative Elections, JPPR gave voter education to 117,000 volunteers throughout Indonesia. JPPR also monitored the 2004 Legislative Election and carried out voter education activities. From 2007-2008, JPPR carried out monitoring missions for local elections in various provinces and districts. For the 2009 election, JPPR mobilized around 3,500 volunteers to serve as monitors. In 2010, JPPR had monitored elections in 10 regions across Indonesia with more than 3,000 volunteers. JPPR has conducted monitoring missions in areas such as Bandar Lampung, Blitar, Cianjur, Cilacap and Ketapang.

From 2011-2012, JPPR has also been involved in monitoring the accessibility of 5 local elections in Indonesia: Mamuju, Tangerang Selatan, Bangka Belitung, Jogjakarta and Jakarta, as part of the AGENDA partnership. They have also developed an accessible election monitoring checklist, which was used in the observations.

Here are some examples of JPPR activities from the last 3 years:

JPPR activities from the last 3 years

History of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

CRPD was adopted by the UN General Assembly in 2006The United Nations Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), commonly referred to as “the Disability Convention”, is a unique human rights instrument that serves as both a development tool and a human rights instrument. Also, it is a legally binding policy instrument which is cross-disability and cross sector. The purpose of Disability Convention, as stated in Article 1, is to “promote, protect and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by all persons with disabilities, and to promote respect for their inherent dignity.” The Convention stipulates aspects and sectors related to disability rights and how to adopt the principles into the legislations and program actions. Hence, every state that has ratified the CRPD should adopt the Convention into its national and local legislation. The Convention is followed by the optional protocol to implement the convention strategically in the States parties. The Optional Protocol is also an international treaty. The Optional Protocol establishes two procedures aimed at strengthening the implementation and monitoring of the Convention. The first is an individual communications procedure allowing individuals to bring petitions to the Committee claiming breaches of their rights; the second is an inquiry procedure giving the Committee authority to undertake inquiries of grave or systematic violations of the Convention.

In the 1980s, several countries started discussions about establishing a human rights treaty for people with disabilities. The next progress was a draft treaty that was completed in 2004. It was negotiated by the United Nations Ad Hoc Committee through intensive meetings in 2006. The negotiations resulted in the fastest human rights treaty enacted in the history of human rights treaties. On December 13, 2006, the United Nations General Assembly adopted by consensus the Disability Convention and its protocol. Then, it was opened for signature on March 30, 2007 at the United Nations Headquarters in New York City, USA. Over 80 countries became signatories during the opening ceremony. Jamaica was the first country to ratify. The Convention entered into force on May 3, 2008. As of October 2012, there have been 154 signatories to the Convention, 90 signatories to the Optional Protocol, 125 ratifications and accessions to the Convention, and 75 ratifications and accessions to the Protocol. Principally, the CRPD requires political will and commitment from various governmental sectors at national and local level, as well as of civil society. Moreover, the government should mainstream disability rights into their legislations at the national and local level.

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AGENDA Newsletter - 2nd edition

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2nd Edition

Featured News

The Rights of Persons with Disabilities in Regional Human Rights Declarations and Conventions around the World

In November, head of states of Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) will gather in Phnom Penh for the 21st ASEAN Summit. There, they are expected to adopt the ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD), which will represent a major milestone in the struggle for human rights in Southeast Asia, including for the human rights of persons with disabilities. Since the beginning of the drafting process, disabled people’s organizations have been involved in the consultation process with the drafting committee, the ASEAN Intergovernmental Committee on Human Rights (AICHR). They have lobbied, discussed and given inputs and suggestions to the committee on how to include the rights of persons with disabilities in the declarations. It is expected that the declaration will include several provisions on disabilities.

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CDPO Logo

Cambodia National Assembly Agrees to Ratify UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

Phnom Penh, Cambodia. On 10 August, 2012 the Cambodia National Assembly has agreed to ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and its Optional Protocol. The Cambodian government had signed the Convention since 1 October 2007. Many disabled people’s organizations in Cambodia had encouraged the government to ratify the Convention over the years. Therefore the news that the National Assembly finally agreed on the ratification of CRPD was greeted with delight by many disabled people’s organizations in Cambodia.

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Organization Profile

ppci-logo

The Center for Election Access of Citizens with Disabilities (PPUA Penca)

The Center for Election Access of Citizens with Disabilities (Pusat Pemilihan Umum Akses Penyandang Cacat, PPUA Penca) was established in 2004, initiated due to the concern for the lack of attention, protection and equality for voters with disabilities. PPUA Penca’s mandate is to advocate for political rights for persons with disabilities in elections, especially for setting up facilities accessible to voters with impairments. Voter education and simulation exercises were conducted in five provinces for the 2004 elections, including special sessions for voters with hearing impairments.

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Interview

ngin-saorath

Ngin Saorath: Never Give Up on Your Life

Discrimination that he faced since a young age does not make Ngin Saorath hopeless to live his life as a person with disability. It even motivated him to fight for the disability rights in his country, Cambodia. He hopes that persons with disability (PwDs) can live as equal to other people without disability. Now he dedicates his life as the Executive Director of Cambodia Disabled People Organization (CDPO).

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On The Horizon

View Full Calender

Mon Oct 8-11, 2012
Workshop on Election Related Challenges in Young Democracies
Mon Oct 29-30, 2012
Training module for Election Management Board
Sat Nov 10-11, 2012
2nd Regional Dialogue on Access to Elections for Persons with Disabilities
 

Photo Gallery

AGENDA GIZ Workshop

Multimedia

  • Video - Accessible election. Click here

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USAID - Indonesia

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AGENDA Giving Presentation at GIZ Workshop for ASEAN Journalists

By: Dipo Djungdjungan Summa

On Tuesday, 19 September 2012, the AGENDA team gave a one-hour presentation at a workshop organized by GIZ (the German Agency for International Cooperation) for journalists from Southeast Asia. The workshop was attended by journalist from Indonesia, Brunei, Vietnam, Myanmar, Timor Leste and Vietnam. AGENDA was invited by GIZ to present the project to the participants.

Agenda Giving Presentation at Giz Workshop for Asean Journalists

In addition to sharing information about AGENDA’s activities, the team also presented about the terminologies that should be used by media when covering news about disability and elections. Past findings from working with media have taught AGENDA that it is important that journalists are aware and understand about disability rights and use the correct terminology. AGENDA shared with the participants on the importance of using a rights-based model of disability and people’s first terminology in their reports and coverage.

The rights-based model of disability describes disability as a result of one’s interaction with the surrounding environment. On this model, disability results not only from the health condition of a person but arises from the person’s inability to participate fully as a member of a society because the existence of barriers, attitudinal and environmental, in the society.

“People’s first language” is a specific approach that should be used by the media, or other stakeholders, when talking about or to persons with disabilities. “People’s first language” requires the stakeholder to put the person first, not the disability (the disability is the adjective, not the noun). Labeling the person as their disability assumes their disability is their defining feature. Some examples of people’s first language are: “persons with disabilities” (instead of “handicapped”), “he uses wheelchair” (instead of “he is wheelchair bound”), and so on.

The AGENDA’s team expressed their hope that in the future media will put more emphasis in using “people’s first language” in their reporting. Also, no less important, AGENDA is hoping for the media to play an increased role in promoting the rights of persons with disabilities. The media can increase the quality and quantity of news coverage related to persons with disabilities. By increased coverage, AGENDA hopes to improve the awareness of general public on the issue. Another role that the media can play is by providing information that can be accessible for persons with disabilities, especially for persons who have hearing or visual disabilities.

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